Friday, November 26, 2010

The Magic of Honey !

Magic Of Honey


Bees from the nectar of the flowers produce honey a sweet sticky substance. From ages honey has been an essential part in the beauty regimes.


Lets take a look at the benefits that honey has provided us.


* Honey has anti-microbial properties and is known to treat minor irritations and sun burns.

* It is a good substance that should be used in moisturizers, creams and other beauty products as honey has the ability to retain water.

* One teaspoon of honey poured in a mug of water and if used for the last rinse will bring a shine to the hair. It will work wonders and make your hair soft and silky.

* It works well with alpha hydroxy acids - it helps soothe the skin against an abrasive treatment.

* Apply equal parts of honey and milk and leave for twenty minutes, you will notice a glow on your skin.

* Honey fights against any kind of skin damage and ageing as it has antioxidant properties.

* It also helps to fight against the damage caused by sun's UV rays.

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Depressed? Maybe you’re just sad - Part 2


With the advent of modern diagnostic criteria, these authors argue, doctors were directed to ignore the context of the patient’s complaints and focus only on symptoms — poor appetite, insomnia, low energy, hopelessness and so on. The current criteria for major depression, they say, largely fail to distinguish between “abnormal” reactions caused by “internal dysfunction” and “normal sadness” brought on by external circumstances. And they blame vested interests — doctors, researchers, pharmaceutical companies — for fostering this bloated concept of depression.


It may seem easy to determine that someone with depressive complaints is reacting to a loss that touched off the depression. Experienced clinicians know this is rarely the case.


Most of us can point to recent losses and disappointments in our lives, but it is not always clear that they are causally related to our becoming depressed. For example, a patient who had a stroke a month ago may appear tearful, lethargic and depressed. To critics, the so-called depression is just “normal sadness” in reaction to a terrible psychological blow. But strokes are also known to disrupt chemical pathways in the brain that directly affect mood. What is the “real” trigger for this patient’s depression? Perhaps it is a combination of psychological and neurological factors. In short, the notion of “reacting” to adverse life events is complex and problematic.


Yes, most psychiatrists would concede that in the space of a brief “managed care” appointment, it’s very hard to understand much about the context of the patient’s depressive complaints. And yes, under such conditions, some doctors are tempted to write that prescription for Prozac or Zoloft and move on to the next patient.


But the vexing issue of when bereavement or sadness becomes a disorder, and how it should be treated, requires much more research. Most psychiatrists believe that undertreatment of severe depression is a more pressing problem than overtreatment of “normal sadness.” NYT NEWS SERVICE

 
Concluded
 
 

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Depressed? Maybe you’re just sad - Part 1


OVER-DIAGNOSED: The vexing issue of when bereavement or sadness becomes a disorder, and how it should be treated, requires much more research. Psychiatry Has Medicalized Normal Sadness By Failing To Consider The Social And Emotional Context


Let’s say a patient walks into my office and says he’s been feeling down for the past three weeks. A month ago, his fiancee left him for another man, and he feels there’s no point in going on. He has not been sleeping well, his appetite is poor and he has lost interest in nearly all of his usual activities.


Should I give him a diagnosis of clinical depression? Or is my patient merely experiencing what the 14th-century monk Thomas a Kempis called “the proper sorrows of the soul”? The answer is more complicated than some critics of psychiatric diagnosis think.


To these critics, psychiatry has medicalized normal sadness by failing to consider the social and emotional context in which people develop low mood — for example, after losing a job or experiencing the breakup of an important relationship. This diagnostic failure, the argument goes, has created a bogus epidemic of increasing depression.


In their recent book ‘The Loss of Sadness’ (Oxford, 2007), Allan Horwitz and Jerome Wakefield assert that for thousands of years, symptoms of sadness that were “with cause” were separated from those that were “without cause.” Only the latter were viewed as mental disorders.


To Be Continued ....











Friday, November 19, 2010

MYTHS ABOUT SLEEP - Part 5


Myth 9  :  Children who don’t get enough sleep at night will show signs of sleepiness during the day

Unlike adults, children who don’t get enough sleep at night typically become more active than normal during the day. They also show difficulty paying attention and behaving properly. Consequently, they may be misdiagnosed as having attention deficit hyperactivity.



Myth 10  :  The main cause of insomnia is worry

Although worry or stress can cause a short bout of insomnia, a persistent inability to fall asleep or stay asleep at night can be caused by a number of other factors. Certain medications and sleep disorders can keep you up at night. Other common causes of insomnia are depression, anxiety disorders, and asthma, arthritis, or other medical conditions with symptoms that become more troublesome at night. Some people who have chronic insomnia also appear to be more revved up than normal, so it is harder for them to fall asleep.


Concluded


Source : forum.abfun.net







Thursday, November 18, 2010

MYTHS ABOUT SLEEP - Part 4


Myth 7  :  Naps are a waste of time

Although naps do not substitute for a good night’s sleep, they can be restorative and help counter some of the impaired performance that results from not getting enough sleep at night. Naps can actually help you learn how to do certain tasks quicker. But avoid taking naps later than 3 p.m., as late naps can interfere with your ability to fall asleep at night. Also, limit your naps to no longer than 1 hour because longer naps will make it harder to wake up and get back in the swing of things. If you take frequent naps during the day, you may have a sleep disorder that should be treated.



Myth 8  :  Snoring is a normal part of sleep

Snoring during sleep is common, particularly as a person gets older. Evidence is growing that snoring on a regular basis can make you sleepy during the day and more susceptible to diabetes and heart disease. In addition, some studies link frequent snoring to problem behaviour and poorer school achievement in children. Loud, frequent snoring can also be a sign of sleep apnea, a serious sleep disorder that should be treated.

 
To Be Continued.....
 
 
Source : forum.abfun.net
 

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

MYTHS ABOUT SLEEP - Part 3



Myth 5  :   Extra sleep at night can cure you of problems with excessive daytime fatigue

Not only is the quantity of sleep important but also the quality of sleep. Some people sleep 8 or 9 hours a night but don’t feel well rested when they wake up because the quality of their sleep is poor. A number of sleep disorders and other medical conditions affect the quality of sleep. Sleeping more won’t alleviate the daytime sleepiness these disorders or conditions cause. However, many of these disorders or conditions can be treated effectively with changes in behaviour or with medical therapies.



Myth 6  :  You can make up for lost sleep during the week by sleeping more on the weekends

Although this sleeping pattern will help relieve part of a sleep debt, it will not completely make up for the lack of sleep. This pattern also will not make up for impaired performance during the week because of not sleeping enough. Furthermore, sleeping later on the weekends can affect your biological clock so that it is much harder to go to sleep at the right time on Sunday nights and get up early on Monday mornings. To sleep better you really should get these sleep myths out of the way.


To Be Continued ....

Source : forum.abfun.net

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

MYTHS ABOUT SLEEP - Part 2


Myth 3  :  Your body adjusts quickly to different sleep schedules

Your biological clock makes you most alert during the daytime and most drowsy at night. Thus, even if you work the night shift, you will naturally feel sleepy when night time comes. Most people can reset their biological clock, but only by appropriately timed cues—and even then, by 1–2 hours per day at best. Consequently, it can take more than a week to adjust to a dramatically altered sleep/wake cycle, such as you encounter when travelling across several time zones or switching from working the day shift to the night shift.



Myth 4  :   People need less sleep as they get older

Older people don’t need less sleep, but they often get less sleep or find their sleep less refreshing. That’s because as people age, they spend less time in the deep, restful stages of sleep and are more easily awakened. Older people are also more likely to have insomnia or other medical conditions that disrupt their sleep.

 
To Be Continued ....


Source : forum.abfun.net

Monday, November 15, 2010

MYTHS ABOUT SLEEP - Part 1

MYTHS ABOUT SLEEP


Myth 1: Sleep is a time when your body and brain shut down for rest and relaxation

No evidence shows that any major organ (including the brain) or regulatory system in the body shuts down during sleep. Some physiological processes actually become more active while you sleep. For example, secretion of certain hormones is boosted, and activity of the pathways in the brain needed for learning and memory is heightened. To sleep better you must get rid of many sleep myths including this one and only accept the sleeping facts!



Myth 2: Getting just 1 hour less sleep per night than needed will not have any effect on your daytime functioning

This lack of sleep may not make you noticeably sleepy during the day. But even slightly less sleep can affect your ability to think properly and respond quickly, and it can compromise your cardiovascular health and energy balance as well as the ability to fight infections, particularly if lack of sleep continues. If you consistently do not get enough sleep, eventually a sleep debt builds up that will make you excessively tired during the day.


To Be Continued ....


Source : forum.abfun.net

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